Why?

April 22, 2016

R Courses at Newcastle

Filed under: Computing, R, Teaching — Tags: , — csgillespie @ 7:09 pm

Over the next two months I’m running a number of R courses at Newcastle University.

  • May 2016
    • May 10th, 11th: Predictive Analytics
    • May 16th – 20th: Bioconductor
    • May 23rd, 24th: Advanced programming
  • June 2016
    • June 8th: R for Big Data
    • June 9th: Interactive graphics with Shiny

Since these courses are on  advanced topics, numbers are limited (there’s only a couple of places left on Predictive Analytics). If you are interested in attending, sign up as soon as possible.

Getting to Newcastle is easy. The airport is 10 minutes from the city centre and has direct flights to the main airport hubs: Schiphol, Heathrow, and Paris.  The courses at Newcastle attract participants from around the world; at the April course, we had representatives from North America, Sweden, Germany,  Romania and Geneva.

Cost: The courses cost around £130 per day (more than half the price of certain London courses!)

 

Onsite courses available on request.

September 17, 2011

UK R Courses – 2012

Filed under: Conferences, R, Teaching — Tags: , , — csgillespie @ 1:01 pm

The School of Mathematics & Statistics at Newcastle University (UK), are again running some R courses. In January, 2012, we will run:

The courses aren’t aimed at teaching statistics, rather they aim to go through the fundemental concepts of R programming. Further information is available at the course website. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me: colin.gillespie@newcastle.ac.uk

 

Bespoke courses are also on request.

January 28, 2011

R books for undergraduate students

Filed under: R, Teaching — Tags: , , , , , , — csgillespie @ 10:18 pm

In a recent post, I asked for suggestions for introductory R computing books. In particular, I was looking for books that:

  • Assume no prior knowledge of programming.
  • Assume very little knowledge of statistics. For example, no regression.
  • Are cheap, since they are for undergraduate students.

Some of my cons aren’t really downsides as such. Rather, they just indicate that the books aren’t suitable for this particular audience. A prime example is “R in a Nutshell”.

I ended up recommending five books to the first year introductory R class.

Recommended Books

  • A first course in statistical programming with R (Braun & Murdoch)
    • Pros: I quite like this book (hence the reason I put it on my list). It has a nice collection of exercises, it “looks nice” and doesn’t assume knowledge of programming. It also doesn’t assume (or try to teach) any statistics.
    • Cons: When describing for loops and functions the examples aren’t very statistical. For example, it uses Fibonacci sequences in the while loop section and the sieve of Eratosthenes for if statements.
  • An introduction to R (Venables & Smith)
    • Pros: Simple, short and to the point. Free copies available. Money from the book goes to the R project.
    • Cons: More a R reference guide than a textbook.
  • A Beginner´s Guide to R by Zuur.
    • Pros: Assumes no prior knowledge. Proceeds through concepts slowly and carefully.
    • Cons: Proceeds through concepts very slowly and carefully.
  • R in a Nutshell by Adler.
    • I completely agree with the recent review by Robin Wilson: “Very comprehensive and very useful, but not good for a beginner. Great book though – definitely has a place on my bookshelf.”
    • Pros: An excellent reference.
    • Cons: Only suitable for students with a previous computer background.
  • Introduction to Scientific Programming and Simulation Using R by Jones, Maillardet and Robinson.
    • Pros: A nice book that teaches R programming. Similar to the Braun & Murdoch book.
    • Cons: A bit pricey in comparison to the other books.

Books not being recommended

These books were mentioned in the comments of the previous post.

  • The Basics of S-PLUS by Krause & Olson.
    • Most students struggle with R. Introducing a similar, but slightly different language is too sadistic.
  • Software for Data Analysis: Programming with R by Chambers.
    • Assumed some previous statistical knowledge.
  • Bayesian Computation with R by Albert.
    • Not suitable for first year students who haven’t taken any previous statistics courses.
  • R Graphics by Paul Murrell
    • I know graphics are important, but a whole book for an undergraduate student might be too much. I did toy with the idea of recommending this book, but I thought that five recommendations were more than sufficient.
  • ggplot2 by Hadley Wickham.
    • Great book, but our students don’t encounter ggplot2 in their undergraduate course.

Online Resources

  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics by Kerns
    • Suitable for a combined R and statistics course. But I don’t really do much stats in this module.
  • The R Programming wikibook (a work in progress).
    • Will give the students this link.
  • Biological Data Analysis Using R by Rodney J. Dyer. Available under the CC license.
    • Nice resource. Possibly a little big for this course (I know that this is very picky, but I had to draw the line somewhere). Will probably use it for future courses.
  • Hadley Wickham’s devtools wiki (a work in progress).
    • Assumes a good working knowledge of R
  • The R Inferno by Patrick Burns
    • Good book, but too advanced for students who have never programmed before.
  • Introduction to S programming
    • It’s in french – this may or may not be a good thing depending on your point of view😉

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